Hotels, Resorts, Travel Reservations with
Discount & Reliable Service.

  • Amman City Tour + Dead Sea
    • Package Inclusive:
      •Capital City of Jordan
      •Citadel Entrance Ticket
      •National Museum Entrance Ticket
      •Roman Amphitheatre Entrance Ticket
      •Folklore Museum Entrance Ticket
      •2-hour Swimming ( Holiday Inn Dead Sea Hotel )
      •Baptism Site Entrance Ticket
      •Lunch at Lebanese House
      ** Pick-up and Drop Off service from Amman City (Guided Tour)
  • Amman City Tour + Jerash Full Day Tour
    • Package Inclusive:
      •Capital City of Jordan
      •Citadel Entrance Ticket
      •National Museum Entrance Ticket
      •Roman Amphitheatre Entrance Ticket
      •Folklore Museum Entrance Ticket
      •North of Amman
      •Ancient City of Jerash
      •Lunch at Lebanese House
      ** Pick-up and Drop Off service from Amman City (Guided Tour)
Amman is the capital and largest city of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan (population c. 2.1 million). Amman forms a great base for exploring the country and does, in fact, hold a few items of interest to the traveler. The city is generally well-appointed for the traveler and the people are very friendly.
Amman Tour

Amman Tour
Although not seen as much when in the air over Amman, the city holds many surprises for the visitor. Anything can be found in Amman if one asks. Visit Amman's Roman Amphitheatre or study in the University of Jordan or stay in the luxurious Marriott. Malls are abundant in Jordan. With new construction in Abdali, in a few years the traveler could eat in the most high-end restaurant, study in the American University of Jordan, stay in a five star hotel or shop in massive malls, all a few metres from one another.


Dead Sea

Dead Sea
The water in the Dead Sea is extremely salty, and has been estimated to be the second saltiest major body of water in the world. Its name is derived from the fact that the water is far too salinated for marine inhabitation.

The Dead Sea is naturally endorheic (no outlet streams) with the Jordan River being its only major source. The northern part of the Dead Sea receives scarcely 100 mm (4 inches) of rain a year; the southern section receives barely 50 mm (2 inches). Due to the man-made reduction of the Jordan River (the river waters are 70-90 % used for human purposes) and the high evaporation rate of the Dead Sea, the sea is shrinking. All the shallow waters of the southern end of the sea have been drained and are now salt flats.

Although the Dead Sea would never entirely disappear (because evaporation slows down as surface area decreases and saltiness increases), measures are currently being proposed to siphon water from the Red Sea through a series of tunnels or canals in order to replentish the rapidly shrinking waters and provide water and electrical solutions to the surrounding countries.


Amman Citadel

Amman Citadel

Jabal al-Qal'a

Amman Citadel
Jabal al-Qal'a, also called Amman Citadel is a national historic site at the center of downtown Amman, Jordan. Known in Arabic as Jabal al-Qal'a, the L-shaped hill is one of the seven jabals that originally made up Amman. Evidence of occupation since the pottery Neolithic period has been found, making it among the world's oldest continuously inhabited places.

The Amman Citadel’s history represents significant civilizations that stretched across continents and prospered for centuries, as one empire gave rise to the next. It also symbolizes the birth of the three great monotheistic religions - Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Settlement at the Citadel extends over 7,000 years. The site represents a passage in time with an astounding open-air museum to explore as a part of the heritage of mankind.

The site has Biblical references, is associated with iconic deities, was besieged by wars, ruled by celebrated leaders, crushed by earthquakes and home to profoundly different cultures.

Though the fortification walls enclose the heart of the site, the ancient periods of occupation covered large areas. Historic structures, tombs, arches, walls and stairs have no modern borders, and therefore there is considerable archaeological potential at this site, as well as in surrounding lands, and throughout Amman.

The Amman Citadel is also the site of the first national Archaeological Museum, which is home to an extraordinary collection of these artifacts as well as objects from other Jordanian historic sites.

A great part of the Citadel remains unexcavated. These areas hold a promise of future discovery. With advances in scientific methods, exploration may soon be possible with minimal disturbance to historic layers of evidence.

Recent site improvement works led by the Greater Amman Municipality with the Department of Antiquities, the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities and the Jordan Tourism Development Project / USAID have been recently undertaken to make the Citadel site more accessible, better understood and welcoming, for the enjoyment of all visitors.
Although the Dead Sea would never entirely disappear (because evaporation slows down as surface area decreases and saltiness increases), measures are currently being proposed to siphon water from the Red Sea through a series of tunnels or canals in order to replentish the rapidly shrinking waters and provide water and electrical solutions to the surrounding countries.


Odeon Amman

Odeon Amman
On the eastern side of what was the Forum stands the 500-seat Odeon. Built in the 2nd century AD, it served mainly as a venue for musical performances. The small amphitheatre was probably enclosed with a wooden or temporary tent roof to shield the performers and audience from the elements.


Odeon Amman

Jerash
Jerash, a city in northern Jordan, is famous for its Roman ruins. The archaeological site is popular for tourists, second only to Petra.

Located some 48 km (30 miles) north of the capital Amman, Jerash is known for the ruins of the Greco-Roman city of Gerasa, also referred to as Antioch on the Golden River. It is sometimes misleadingly referred to as the "Pompeii of the Middle East", referring to its size, extent of excavation and level of preservation (though Jerash was never buried by a volcano).

Jerash became an urban center during the 3rd century BC and a member of the federation of Greek cities known as the Decapolis ("ten cities" in Greek). Jerash prospered during the 1st century BC as a result of its position on the incense and spice trade route from the Arabian Peninsula to Syria and the Mediterranean region. Jerash was a favorite city of the Roman emporer, Hadrian, and reached its zenith in AD 130, flourishing economically and socially. The city began to decline in the 3rd century, later becoming a Christian city under the rule of the Byzantine empire. The Muslims took over in AD 635, but the final blow to the city was dealt by Baldwin II of Jerusalem in AD 1112 during the Crusades.

Modern Jerash sprawls to the east of the ruins, sharing the same city wall but little else. Thankfully, the ruins have been carefully preserved and spared from encroachment.


Amman Map
Follow Us:
Copyright 2005-2018 ©SeatHolidays.com All Rights Reserved
"Seatholidays" and "We are Here To Serve You"are trademarks of Seat Holidays Dubai LLC. / Seat Leisure Travel and Tours/ Seat Holidays Travel and Tours .